Posts Tagged ‘new york’

Thursday August 31, 2017, 10:00am - by Promo Team

Welcome to Magnet’s “Getting To Know” series! We’re using our blog to highlight our fabulous performers and writers and we can’t wait for you to meet them. Want to see them all? Click here.

What’s your name?

Jessica Coyle

Which team or show are you on?

Captains

Where are you from?

Cincinnati, Ohio

How did you get into improv/sketch comedy?

When I was living in Korea, I saw a posting in a meetup group about doing comedy in English. I showed up a week early by mistake, I was so excited! It was great. I performed with them in Korea, China, the US, and Canada for 5 years. Most expat improv is short form, but after watching a show on a vacation to NYC that blew my mind I tried to teach myself long form techniques by reading books and watching YouTube videos. Trust me, it’s better to learn that stuff in a class. (Fun fact about that time: I accidentally said “improvist” instead of “improviser” for YEARS without anyone correcting me.)

How long have you been performing/writing?

My first big role was as a child bride Mrs. Claus in the 4th grade, so about 975 years now?

Who in all the world would be your ideal scene or writing partner?

Paul F Tompkins, though I’d probably faint on him and get his fancy suit all rumpled.

Who would you most like to impersonate or write for? 

A small goat.

What makes you laugh the hardest?

My sister – is she a what? Otherwise, certain Magnet performers I won’t mention here for fear of appearing too obsequious.

Describe the soundtrack to your life!

A low droning moan, interspersed with the crack of fresh carrots being snapped in twain.

What’s something you’d ask when meeting someone for the first time?

Oh God, we’ve actually met before, haven’t we. please forgive me.

Where can we find you on a Saturday night?

Are you hunting me? Are you HUNTING ME? I AM DIONYSUS, GOD OF MASKS, AND YE SHALL NEVER FIND ME, WOODSMAN!

What, in your opinion, is the worst starburst flavor?

Burnt Foot (tied with Hot Wings Burp)

Wednesday August 30, 2017, 12:54pm - by Megan Gray

Musical Megawatt - Musical Improv

We are excited to announce the next round of auditions for Musical Megawatt!

This season, auditions will take place on Saturday, September 23rd, 6:30pm to 10:30pm, with callbacks on Sunday, October 1st at the same time.  Both rounds of auditions will be at the Magnet Training Center, located at 22 West 32nd Street on the 10th Floor.

To submit for an audition time, please fill out THIS FORM! Please note only people who have completed Musical Level 3 at the Magnet are eligible to audition.

Submissions must be received by Wednesday, September 13th, and emails with assigned audition times will be sent out on Friday the 15th.

If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to email Michael Lutton at mjlutton@gmail.com.

We look forward to seeing you at auditions!

Friday August 25, 2017, 8:01pm - by Magnet Theater

“The First 30 Seconds”

Legendary improv instructor and our good buddy from Chicago, Joe Bill, is stopping by Magnet to teach a one day workshop on Sunday, September 3rd, from 1-4 pm. Joe will be teaching a new version of his newest workshop “The First 30 Seconds” which focuses on the verbal, emotional, physical, and psychological content of the first 30 seconds of scenes to help you get optimally grounded and connected to what’s happening REGARDLESS of the approach/style in which you’re playing.

In Improvisation, so often, the ending is in the beginning. Let Joe help you begin your scenes in service to yourself, your scene partners, and the show you’re doing. He’ll show you how to attack the first 0-15 & 15-30 seconds (The Golden Time) of a scene. This includes the mindset of readiness, playing with energy variety for initiations, strategic & emotional listening, awareness of interpersonal vs. circumstantial dialogue, and tracking the context through patterns that you establish right from the start. Everyone will walk out of this workshop with at least a couple of new tools that they can begin to employ immediately.

Interested? Come play! Cost is $50. Just email Joe to reserve your spot! Email jbillscp [at] yahoo [dot] com

Monday August 21, 2017, 1:31pm - by Magnet Theater

Well folks, Remix is back for Vol. 2!

What is Remix?

Remix is the Magnet Theater’s diversity sketch lab. For seven weeks participants will meet with Magnet Alumni and learn about sketch writing! We start with the basics of what makes a good sketch and take you through the process of writing, getting notes, editing, and performing! All participants will be eligible to have their sketch considered for the show at the end of the the lab, and all participants will have a chance to perform in the show!

Want to see some sketches that made it into last year’s show? Look here: Remix on YouTube

Who is this for?

Remix’s aim is to lift voices of people from marginalized groups, and celebrate diversity of all types – including (but not limited to): race, age, gender identity, orientation, ability, and more!

But I Didn’t Do Remix Vol. 1…

Perfect! There’s no prior experience needed. People who participated last year are welcome to participate again, but we’ll be covering a lot of the same ground.

But I’ve Never Done Sketch Before…

It’s never too late to start! Remix is for people of all experience levels in sketch and comedy writing. Even if you’ve never done sketch comedy or if you’re on a team at another theater, Remix is for you! All experience levels welcome.

OK… But What’s the Catch?

There’s a tiny (less than $10) fee to pay for the show recording and our amazing tech.

To qualify for show participation, we require that you miss no more than 2 meetings and miss no more than 1 show.

But that’s it! Any sketches written in the lab are yours to do with what you please and the seven weeks of classes are absolutely free!

Whoa, that’s pretty sweet. How can I stay up to date on the info?

Our main form of communication will be through our google group: Click here. We will also post everything possible on Facebook (click here), as well.

When does this party start!?

Remix Vol. 2 will be kicking off Saturday, September 23rd @ 12pm.
We’ll be meeting Saturdays from 12 – 3pm in the Magnet Theater Training Center, located at 22 West 32nd St.

And the shows?

Shows will be November 6th, 13th, and 20th at the Magnet Theater (main stage)!

We look forward to seeing all of you at the kickoff meeting 9/23!

Best!
The Remix Team

Wednesday August 16, 2017, 11:50pm - by Megan Gray

sketch teams logo

Congratulations to the newest Magnet Sketch Teams and the newest additions to Just Karen, Nitro Girls, Chillionaire and The Executives! Thanks to everyone who submitted and auditioned this round. Here’s to a brand new season of killer comedy, premiering on Monday, September 11th, 7:30pm.

 

Italicized = new to program
* = new to existing team
+ = promoted to writer/performer

Just Karen – Directed by Matt Alspaugh*
Devin O’Neill +
Kristina Grosspietsch
Morgan Pelligrino
Keith Rubin
Dennis Pacheco
David Fried
Bailey Swilley
Carly Silverman
Elie Stav
Tom Sanchez*

Chillionaire – Directed by Michael Delisle
Duaa Osman
Tanyika Carey
Molly Kiernan
Kate Shine
Kourtni Bebe
Francis Fuster
Greg Cornejo
Skyler Swezy
Nick Wiener*
Brendan Goggins*

Nitro Girls – Directed by Chris Hastings
Sam Rogal
Jesse Mudrick
Justin Morgan
Lanee Sanders
John Ross
Amy Lynn Berger
Alex Braslavsky
Joe Lepore
Chelsea Frei
Leanne Velednitski

Team Bill S. Preston Esquire – Directed by Jesse Acini
Matt Wassung
Diego Martinez
Chloe Lewis
Lorena Russi +
Jennette Cronk
Billy Soco
Zach Kamin
Lauren Overpack
Zackery Stephens
Caroline Castro

Team Ted Theodore Logan – Directed By Chrissie Gruebel
Karina Sahlin
Daniel Louis Sgrizzi
Sarah Cassell
Kyle Levenick
Matt Abedi
Chris Wade
Yoshi Saito
John Graham
Shelley Little
Rachel Robertson

Team Rufus – Directed by Nat Silverman
Katie Sicking
Matt Morea
Patrick Grizzard
Lauren Faylor
Rob Webber
Gina Cucci
Jackie Skinner
Matt Brooks
Alyssa Lott
Annemarie Cullen

Dinosaur Jones – Directed by Joe Lepore
Matt Alspaugh
Nat Silverman
Hayley Karl
Rich Rosario
Ben Koch
Anna Neu
Becca Schall
Jessica Taylor

The Executives – Directed By Kevin Cobbs
Ari Miller
Elena Skopetos*
Evan Forde Barden
Bryan Berlin
Charlie Nicholson
Lane Kwederis
Meredith Burns
Sara Kalkstien*
Kristen Loe*

Tuesday August 15, 2017, 1:40pm - by Promo Team

Alexis Lambright is a writer, storyteller, and cast member of Magnet ensembles The Wrath and The Cast. Alexis also hosts The Griot Show, in which she brings together a range of black performers and storytellers together around a specific theme! In anticipation of this Friday’s edition of The Griot Show, we spoke with Alexis about storytelling, “edutaining,” and pooped pants.

What makes a compelling story?
For me, the thing that makes a story compelling are the details. This is in no way profound, but I’m drawn to stories with a lot of details. Someone could be telling me about the time they pooped their pants in public, and I wanna know which city they were in, the surroundings, the time of day, the temperature, what they wore, what they ate earlier that day, and of course why they pooped their pants in the first place. All of those details allow me to see it happening (that’s not to say that I am obsessed with envisioning someone pooping their pants, I was just using that as an example). Anyway, I’ve heard some very detailed stories that made me feel like I was actually there.

How does your background as an improviser inform your style as a storyteller?
I think my improv background has allowed me to be able to recall stories pretty quickly. I’ve done shows were I had to come up with a story from an audience suggestion, which means going through my mental Rolodex of related stories. In the case of The Griot Show, I might have a story prepared, but maybe something from one of the performer’s stories sparks an idea that leads to a better story!

Your show features a variety of performers from different experiences and performance styles. Aside from improvisers and comedians, what other people have performed at the Griot Show?
Over the past three years, while I started out trying to keep the format to a traditional storytelling show, I’ve found that the show is really great when the performers tell a story through other mediums. I’ve had a video artist on who showed a piece that he directed, in which Harriet Tubman and other slaves were doing interpretive dance to Britney Spears’ “I’m A Slave 4 U”. There have been poets who have shared stories through their work, a few performers have incorporated music into their pieces, and I’ve even projected illustrations from a book I wrote at the tender age of six about slavery. Yes, 6 year-old me wrote a book about slavery. One of my absolute favorite guests on the show was Mr. Dabney Montgomery, who served the U.S. Army Air Corps as one of the Tuskegee Airmen. When I tell you it was an honor, privilege, and just an absolute DREAM COME TRUE having him bless my little ol’ show, I am dead serious! He was phenomenal!

What inspired you to produce this show?
I was approached by Beth Newell (former Magnet Sketch Program head) about creating a show that would bring some diversity to the Magnet stage. I brainstormed some ideas and finally decided on a storytelling show for Black History Month. The first two times went so well, that people came up to me and said “have you ever thought about having the show more than just once a year?” The next show was on Juneteenth for its historical significance to African Americans, and eventually I did the show every other month. I’d like to make it a monthly show, but I need help either producing or hosting it.

You’ve been hosting the Griot Show for a while now. How has the show changed over time since you first started hosting it?
As I mentioned before, it’s been a little over three years since the show debuted. In the beginning, it didn’t have a specific theme- I just wanted to get more black people performing at the Magnet. Now, I will try to come up with a theme for the show, like “Juneteenth Edition”, “Pride Month+Loving Day Edition”, etc. Also, because I love it when a show is “edutaining” (educational and entertaining), I try to do black history or theme-related trivia questions with the audience. There are prizes, too!

Check out The Griot Show this Friday, August 18th at 7pm!

Friday August 11, 2017, 6:58pm - by Magnet Theater

For the entire month of September, all room rentals at the Magnet Training Center are only $10 an hour! That’s right – between the hours of 11AM and 11PM, seven days a week, every single one of our lovely rehearsal spaces is available for the low price of $10/hr. Rehearse at Magnet Training Center and save your hard-earned cash for that bus ticket home! Or a flight to Miami. Player’s choice. 😉

Thursday August 10, 2017, 10:00am - by Promo Team

Welcome to Magnet’s “Getting To Know” series! We’re using our blog to highlight our fabulous performers and writers and we can’t wait for you to meet them. Want to see them all? Click here.

 

What’s your name?

Spencer Campbell

Which team or show are you on?

Hot Charles

Where are you from?

Ojai, California

How did you get into improv/sketch comedy?

My dad lives in LA, and as a kid we’d often go see The Groundlings, Theatresports, and an improv troupe called LA Connection when I visited on weekends. I loved it, and secretly wanted to do it myself, but pushed the feeling deep inside for fear I’d follow up on it. Many years passed in which I lived several lives. By the time I took my first improv class, I was already an old man.

How long have you been performing/writing?

I’m very sorry to blow your mind, but it’s five years *to the hour* since my first improv class as I’m responding to this. I have an app that tells me how long it’s been so I can calibrate my nostalgia. I’ve been writing, in one way or another, since I developed the motor skills.

Who in all the world would be your ideal scene or writing partner?

Hmm. Improvisers pull out such different qualities from each other depending on the pairing. Zach Woods is my favorite improviser, and we’d probably do a very sensible only-straight-man Harold. I’d also love to be a wildcard with a sillypants wildcard like Lauren Lapkus or Thomas Middleditch. I think it would be fun to improvise with my brother and mom. I bet we’d do a dinner scene. Finally, I’d like to be Charlie Kaufman’s writing partner. I imagine we’d sit in silence on opposite sides of the room from each other for six months, doing separate projects, then switch.

Who would you most like to impersonate or write for? 

Write for: Christopher Morris, Armando Iannucci, Charlie Kaufman, Richard Foreman, David Lynch. Impersonate? Stan Laurel.

What makes you laugh the hardest?

Onstage, a dumb, wrong person insisting they’re smart and right. And nothing makes me laugh harder than someone treating a bonkers-absurd point of view as though it’s the most reasonable thing in the world. I’m also a sucker for endless, unvarying, patience-trying repetition. And I think throwing up is funny, but not farting.

Describe the soundtrack to your life!

The Eraserhead steam noises.

What’s something you’d ask when meeting someone for the first time?

What do you enjoy doing besides…this?

Where can we find you on a Saturday night?

At a practice, a show, or at home. It would be very strange to see me anywhere else.

What is your favorite place to go on a weekday afternoon when you have no plans or obligations?

The dog park, with my real friends.

Wednesday August 9, 2017, 3:49am - by Promo Team

Lorena Russi is a comedian, actor, and creator of a brand new show at Magnet, Timoteo. Timoteo is a stand-up comedy show that consciously thinks about what our bodies/status bring to performances. Each show will have people from one identity sitting in the audience as comics from the counter community perform a set. It’s an incredibly interesting concept and so we wanted to ask Lorena a few questions before the show’s big premiere next week.

What inspired you to create the show Timoteo?
Timoteo is a show inspired by lack of versatile spaces for marginalized communities. It’s designed so that groups can come together without it being in the context of a bar or to hook up. I was also curious about combining opposites in order to highlight how status and bodies affect space and performance. Essentially, I wanted to design a situation where people of the same tribe can engage, to not only learn more about each other and themselves but witness it through a comedic lens.

What’s the origin of the name Timoteo?
Timoteo was the name of my grandmother’s pet bird in Colombia. Apparently, the bird acted like a dog and was a real treasure of the Russi household. One day someone brought a pig into the apartment -this was Colombia in the 80s, so pigs were the equivalent to a new born baby- and it swallowed the bird. SWALLOWED. THE. BIRD. The poster is a photo of my grandmother and Timoteo together, and I appreciate how their colors, physicality, and tone contrast entirely, but show how they love each other. Since the show is about opposites coming together, I wanted to reflect that in it’s photo/name…even thought I’m probably the only person who understands that.

Your show involves comics performing for audiences that are their opposites. How do you attract these specific audiences to your show?
Well at this point my strategy is just running around to all of the Queer bars, talking to homo ladies, and not bringing up how late on a Monday night the show is. BUT. In practice it’s been pretty incredible to see just through word of mouth alone how people have shown interest. There’s not many shows that make it so that only a certain group or community can attend, which I think has made it interesting for people when I tell them about it. Ultimately it’s meant to bring fun to the audience on another level than just the performance, so word of mouth and carrier pigeons are what are filling the seats.

Your show on August 14th features exclusively straight, cisgendered male comedians performing for a queer female-identifying audience. What inspired you to bring these two groups together in this way?
There’s obviously a bias for the first show because I am a Queer female identifying person, but I wanted to able to experience the show as an audience member, especially for the first one, in order to get a feel for how it is impacting the audience. I also wanted it to be as specific as possible in the two groups and boy howdy is it specific….I’m sorry for saying boy howdy.

What communities would you like to bring together for future versions of Timoteo?
I would love to have POC from NYC with white people from the midwest, Robots/Technology and humans, older adults/young people.

Check out the premiere of Timoteo on Monday, August 14th, at 10:30 pm when Straight, Cisgendered men will do stand-up for Queer, Female identifying people in the audience!

Tuesday August 8, 2017, 1:06pm - by Promo Team

Perri Gross is the host of “Everyone Is Sad,” a stand-up show for comedic performers who are relatively new to stand-up. These performers may appear happy doing improv, sketch, and musical improv–but they are all very tormented and sad and want to stand alone on stage. We sit down with Perri to ask her a few a questions ahead of her August 14th show!

MAGNET: What was attractive to you about hosting a show with relatively inexperienced stand-up comedians?
GROSS: I was lucky to have joined a stand up club in college that helped me work out some kinks in my stand up before performing in shows. We would meet every week and have shows a few times a semester. When I moved to NYC, I couldn’t imagine not having any experience and just hitting the open mic scene. I liked the idea of creating a similar space where people could give stand up a try and the rest of the audience is also new. It helps people feel comfortable to know everyone is on the same page and new. I encourage experienced stand-ups to come to my mic as well so they can get a true reaction from the audience to test out new material. Having new excited comics creates a comradery that is hard to find in the comedy scene.

M: What was the most embarrassing moment of your early days in comedy?
G: At one open mic, I had to stop my set because I felt my material was too upsetting and no one was laughing just making “awww” noises. Most of my material is based off of real stories, and my set that night wasn’t funny it was just sad. I got off the stage, left the venue, and walked all the way home.

M: Where’s the weirdest place you’ve cried, and why?
G: I had a major breakup over the phone near the clock in the middle of Grand Central station. I was dry heaving I was crying so hard. I definitely gave some tourists a great idea of the dreams that awaited them in NYC.

M: What did you start first: improv or standup? What inspired you to make the leap from one to the other?
G: I started doing stand-up first. I did a lot of open mics my first year when I moved to NYC but was looking for an easier way to meet new people and switched over to improv. I found a great community at the Magnet through the classes I took. I was always was hesitant to try improv initially because I like to plan what I am doing. I also hate playing animals and [am] scared to face my fear.

M: Which comedians/improvisers inspired you when you first started?
G: I didn’t watch much stand-up growing up but was probably inspired by watching The Simpsons and Seinfeld with my parents. I did always like George Carlin a lot and found his dark style inspiring and close to my voice.

M: If you could watch any celebrity or public figure try standup for the first time, who would it be?
G: Daddy Yankee. He has a lot to say and I just want him to come out of the wood work. I’m really happy Despacito has put him back on the map and I hope he gets to do a tight 30 soon.

Don’t miss the next Everyone Is Sad, coming up on Monday, August 14th, at 9 pm!