Posts Tagged ‘Michael Showalter’

Friday June 30, 2017, 10:00am - by Magnet Theater

We talk with Magnet co-founder Ed Herbstman about working with producer Judd Apatow on “The Big Sick”

Magnet co-founder and actor, Ed Herbstman, plays Sam Highsmith in one of this summer’s most anticipated comedies, “The Big Sick,” starring Kumail Nanjiani, Zoe Kazan, Holly Hunter, Ray Romano, Aidy Bryant, Bo Burnham, Kurt Braunohler, and David Alan Grier. Directed by Michael Showalter, “The Big Sick” is produced by the legendary comedy writer/director/producer Judd Apatow. In this very special feature, we sit down with Ed for the inside scoop on working with Judd Apatow!

MAGNET: So, what was it like to work with comedy powerhouse Judd Apatow?

EH: I don’t know. I didn’t actually work with him. He was the producer.

M: As a producer, was Judd fun to work with?

EH: He wasn’t there. Michael Showalter directed it. He was great.

M: We’ve always heard that Judd is really a blast on set. Was that your experience?

EH: I’ve heard that too. But again, Judd Apatow wasn’t on set any of the days I worked. Kumail Nanjiani was there, and so was his wife and co-writer Emily V. Gordon. They were great. Funny, warm, playful – truly some of the kindest people I’ve ever worked with.

M: Yes! Of course. This is really Kumail and Emily’s project. And as a producer, Judd Apatow must have his fingerprints all over it.

EH: I can’t really speak to that. I can tell you that my favorite part was improvising with Kumail, Bo Burnham, Aidy Bryant and Kurt Braunohler. Showalter really let us play. I play Sam Highsmith, a stand-up comic who–

M: Is Judd Apatow a good dad?

EH: What?

M: Judd Apatow?

EH: That’s not a question.

M: Knocked Up.

EH: We done?

M: Bye!

Thanks so much to Ed Herbstman for sitting down with us to provide an inside look into what it’s like to work with big time Hollywood producer Judd Apatow. Go see “The Big Sick” in theaters now!

 

Wednesday January 11, 2017, 7:00am - by Magnet Theater
Play

dede-2-podcast Subscribe with iTunes

Ariana Grande’s resident Floridian, DEDE TABAK, joins host Louis Kornfeld to talk about being from Miami, her college improv experience, and how to surprise yourself on stage. That’s just a sample of what this episode has to offer, though. You’ll also get to hear about celebrities, how to handle disgusting scenes on stage, how Dede got her start in the arts, and why strange scene partners are awesome. More too, but you get the idea! Huzzah!

This episode begins with a rare and lengthy cold open and continues in earnest on the subject of celebrity encounters. “How tall is Jemaine Clement?” you may wonder. Well, Dede Tabak has the answer! Louis asks Dede about her comedy roots and what she was into as a child. Dede grew up in Miami, Florida watching In Living Color, presumably because she didn’t live in the part of Miami where people were partying or going to the beach, or maybe it was because she was a child! Louis and Dede exchange methods on running away from home, something they would both occasionally attempt in their youth and Dede shares the story of her parents meeting at NYU and moving from New York to Miami and, how now, Dede works at NYU where it all began. They talk about the burden of asking friends and family to come see your improv shows and how to perform “gross” things on stage, or when to just avoid them.

Backing up, Louis asks Dede what brought her to improv in the first place, and we discover that she began life as a theatrical kid and attended a University of Miami theater camp growing up. She then talks about her college improv days at Fairfield University, where she had a very positive experience under the guidance of Heather Parady, complete with lessons like cut the bullshit, be truthful, and to occasionally burn some sage. Dede and Louis explore what it means to “be truthful” in a scene and how to step out with nothing in mind. Find out how Dede most loves to play and hear her talk about how she (successfully) surprises herself on a regular basis. They also discuss regret in improv, what Dede likes to get from her scene partners, watching improv after-the-fact, and cherishing the strange classmates and scene partners you’ll have along the way. Dede says “vagina” in this episode more than anyone ever has on the show! Plus, A Serious Scene Opposite A Jar Of Pickles!

Wednesday July 20, 2016, 7:00am - by Magnet Theater

SVB & Charles Rogers [small] Subscribe with iTunes

Filmmakers and co-creators of the upcoming series Search Party, SARAH-VIOLET BLISS & CHARLES ROGERS, join special guest host Rebecca Robles to talk about about their big projects, the formation of their partnership, and of course, showbiz. Their 2014 film, Fort Tilden, was completed in a single summer and won that year’s SXSW Grand Jury Award. Since then, the duo has written for Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp, Mozart In The Jungle, and their upcoming TBS series Search Party, which they also directed. Join Rebecca as she talks with SV and Charles about their comedy careers, the ethics of media, and much much more.

We kick off this episode with the thrilling reveal that Charles has known our engineer, Grant, since high school and that everyone has been in HAIR. Rebecca introduces us to her very smart and cool friends, Charles and Sarah-Violet. She asks them about what it was like to have their families experience Fort Tilden for the first time and, in general, the feelings that arise when having their work screened. Hear SV and Charles discuss the stress of such situations, and how to celebrate success and vent frustrations in the strange and competitive world of showbiz.

Our guests answer hard-hitting questions like: “Has SV ever done improv???” and “What is Twitter for???” They comment on working with improvisers on set and we hear this dynamic duo’s origin story, which began in a grad program at NYU. Though Rebecca may know something about it already, for our sake, she asks SV and Charles about the magical process of making Fort Tilden and what it was like to move quickly on such a large project. She also wonders how much of  Search Party is influenced by Fort Tilden? Our two visitors talk about addressing ethics and gray areas in their work and how wanting to be seen as “good” is a major theme of Search Party. Plus, they offer thoughts on how social media is best utilized and how people should go about asking for help. It’s all about looking to give and receive love, rather than asking what someone can do for you. That, my friends, is some damn good advice.

Watch Search Party on TBS later this year, ya cuties!! We guarantee you’ll see some familiar Magnet faces. 🙂

Wednesday October 21, 2015, 7:00am - by Magnet Theater

Phoebe Tyers Podcast Subscribe with iTunes

Magnet performer, writer, and talk show host, PHOEBE TYERS, joins host Louis Kornfeld to talk about the outsider view of comedians, her background in playwriting, and so much more! Phoebe performs regularly on Megawatt with The Music Industry and on Magnet Sketch Teams with Stockton. Additionally, you can catch her late night talk show Phoebe Tonight Tonite regularly at the Magnet. She and Louis dive deep into the psyche of comedians in this episode, which is perfect for all you performers and writers out there. Tune in!

This episode begins with Phoebe and Louis talking about finding comedy despite not being comedy geeks. Adding to that, Phoebe talks about how she doesn’t even like being the center of attention. So how did it come to pass that this woman became so taken with the world of comedy?

Phoebe tells us why, despite making life her a mess, comedy has enriched it in a way she never thought possible. This “wildly dyslexic” comedian speaks with Louis about the secret language and point of view of comedians everywhere that link them to each other and separate them from the “pinks.” Is it possible to enjoy simple things if you’re conditioned to look for the skewering point?

Louis asks Phoebe about her approach to character work in improv and we hear about how certain characters allow Phoebe to share herself with the audience. They explore character and what it means to be truly playing with your teammates. Although she was first mystified by the structure and inner workings of improv, Phoebe comments on the fact that it’s now become more like second nature. They talk about being zen and you get to hear about it.

Maybe you had no idea, but before comedy, Phoebe was a playwright! She and Louis compare and contrast playwriting with sketch comedy and it’s all kinds of interesting. Is length the biggest difference between the two disciplines, or is it more nuanced than that? Hear about Louis’ head-fuck confusion with the “assumed genius” of great playwrights. Plus, Phoebe and Louis take the pretension of certain writers to task.

They talk about Phoebe’s late night show, Phoebe Tonight Tonite, and bringing a little bit of soul to everything she does. At the center of her universe is the idea of telling a good story. They circle back to discussing the beauty of being able to enjoy simple things in life and Phoebe’s experience of acting in a pilot directed by Michael Showalter.